Gifted / 2e Homeschooling : Where to Start?

Words: Gifted / 2e Homeschooling : Where to Start? Picture: Pile of Books

Starting home education can be quite daunting—doubly so if you are deciding to home educate special needs children, whether they are gifted, disabled, or both (called twice exceptional, 2e or GLD). But where to start? What’s out there to help new homeschooling families find resources and information? And what are the challenges that families might face? Continue reading “Gifted / 2e Homeschooling : Where to Start?”

Those 2e Crazy-Eggs Just Keep On Popping Up

You know, when I started this parenting gig, I didn’t really know a lot – hell, what parent does? There’s been highs and lows – the highs are really really high, the lows . . . let’s just say that the Mariana Trench has a lot going for it.

But somewhere along the line, I kind of got the impression that if my kids were hitting the milestones at roughly the right time, “all was well”. (The right time, of course was statistically figured out with a bell curve. They’re really neat and rather mathematically beautiful. I actually like them, as an idea).

Somewhere, in the depths of over eight years of crazy, the bit of my brain that used to sigh with relief when my kids hit those milestones exactly on time got rewritten. Now, when a nurse or doctor assures me that something is perfectly normal, just what they expected of child brain/body/whatever development, I go into full-fledged panic mode. Even though the maths part of my brain keeps reassuring me that my kids have to fall inside the middle of the bell curve for some things, another, perhaps more realistic part of my brain will go “you keep believing that if you like, buster, but I’ll be over here locking myself in the panic room.”
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Book Review – Writing Your Own Script


As parents, we may really want to believe the common wisdom that if we place our children in a typical childhood setting, “They will be fine.”  It can be difficult to separate what others say and what we believe to be true. As parents, we don’t always trust our own instinct. We should.’

 
Finding practical ways to help people understand and work with your neuro – atypical children can be hard. Even when you understand what your child needs to thrive, how do you go about convincing others? I found Corin Barsily Goodwin and Mika Gustavson’s new book “Writing Your Own Script: A Parent’s Role in the Gifted Child’s Social Development”, helped me to understand that journey into the unknown.

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Is Giftedness a Bad Thing?

Picture from Pixabay

There was a conversation that I had quite some time ago that is still bugging me, and being a writer, inevitably that means I end up putting words on paper  in order to figure it out in my own head.  The conversation, for all its twists and turns could be boiled down to one question . . . ‘Is giftedness a bad thing?” You see, once you let go of the assumptions and myths that surround giftedness, and start to understand how many of the characteristics and behaviours of gifted people either resemble certain other conditions (like Autism, ADHD, OCD etc), inevitably, giftedness starts to lose some of the false-shine of being a ‘gift’ . . .
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Wrestling with Wisdom: Lessons I Have Learned About Dealing With Medical Issues

 

text: Wrestling with Wisdom: Lessons I Have Learned About Dealing With Medical Issues | Yellow Readis Image: Stethoscope and blue pen on medical form

 

As a parent who has spent, on average, a minimum of two days every week for the past 6 years going to hospitals, doctors and specialists, I have learned some harsh truths and had some amazing moments of pure serendipity. Somewhere along the way, I picked up a bit of wisdom, though it tends to get lost again pretty quickly. So while I wrestle wisdom to the ground in a head-lock, here are some hard-earned insights I have scraped together that I think are worth talking about.

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Frugal Apartment 2e Homeschooling

 

There are many ways we have changed our lifestyle in order to be able to homeschool our children. Adjusting to the reality of a one-income family involved rethinking many of our assumptions about what we needed and what we could do without. It’s an ongoing process as our needs have changed over time. Some of our decisions have been lifestyle based, and some have been more focused on how we create an environment that is conductive to learning. So today I’d like to step through some of the things we do to try and keep us on the correct side of the ledger.

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Gifted . . .You Know What That Means, Right?

Every now and again, more often than I am comfortable with, various memes pop up in my news feed. They’re usually positive, with a cute picture – a happy child, a beautiful baby, a rainbow over a lovely green field. Rinse and repeat.

And you know what? I love the pictures. They’re cute, they make me go ‘awww’. But it’s not the picture that’s the problem. It’s the words.
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Playing Label Bingo

This week was not a good week.

So far we have managed, between my two children, to tick the boxes on a fair swathe of far too many major chronic diseases. It’s like we’re holding a bingo contest in a doctor’s surgery as they cry out various diagnoses terms, and I’m sitting there with a  blank look and a pencil marking them off against some sort of ineffable list. I call it playing label bingo.
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