SF/Fantasy Gifted Homeschoolers Series: Have Spacesuit, Will Travel

This is part of a series of reviews on books that have gifted homeschoolers of one variety or another as protagonists. A few of these books are also actually sequels or one in a series. If so, I will say. As I explain here, not all these books will be suitable for children to read. But today’s book is one of the happy exceptions. Which is a Heinlein rarity!

Title: Have Spacesuit, Will Travel
Author: Robert A. Heinlein
Genre: SF

Disclaimer: This post has  links to buy books, because if you want to read  this awesome books, I want to make it easier for you – I am a book-enabler.. But you can always hop over to your local library instead – libraries are cool.
Continue reading “SF/Fantasy Gifted Homeschoolers Series: Have Spacesuit, Will Travel”

Spice Biscuits

These yummy biscuits are lovely with a cup of tea, and have an aroma that easily wins me over to the ‘must-eat-biscuits’ cookie-monster dark-side. These biscuits are one of C’s favourites – but then again, he loves most cakes and biscuits. J rather loves crumbling them – and some even gets eaten. They’re also excellent as presents. It’s the freshly ground cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves that really does the trick – yes you can use pre-ground spices, but nothing beats that freshly ground smell. Continue reading “Spice Biscuits”

A Typical Week

Raising a 2e child, like raising any child is both a joy and a struggle. I don’t often talk about the struggle, because I find myself focusing on the positive as much as possible – it makes for a happier me. But the struggle is there, it is real, and it is mixed in with all the rest in a crazy-quilt jumble. So I thought I might walk you through a typical week in our house. This week.
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SF/Fantasy Gifted Homeschoolers Series: Dune

I am going to do a series of reviews on books that have gifted homeschoolers of one variety or another as protagonists. Now there is a caveat here: I haven’t included stories where the protagonist didn’t get an ‘education’ because of deprivation, i.e. like Dragonflight’s Lessa. These will be stories where education and homeschooling actually are talked about within the story, and if possible, form an integral part of the storytelling.

A few of these books are also actually sequels or one in a series. If so, I will say. And explain why the earlier books don’t count! (Though they’re usually also a great read).

Not all these books will be suitable for children to read. This is not designed to be a list to hand to your child. But will, I hope, open the door for books that most will not think about as ‘homeschooling’ books. I hope it’s fun too. Enjoy!

So to kick this off, I’m starting with a classic.

NB. This post has links to buy books – because if you want to read awesome books (or consume their media derivatives) , I want to make it easier for you – I am a book-enabler. . But you can always hop over to your local library instead – libraries are cool.

Title: Dune
Author: Frank Herbert
Genre: SF Continue reading “SF/Fantasy Gifted Homeschoolers Series: Dune”

Unit Study: Bleach and Japan

This is a unit study we stumbled upon awhile ago. You see, we love Anime in our house. And DH and I really love Bleach. In fact, the Bleach theme-song used to put C to sleep when he was a baby (The first one. Yes, the loud one!)

And life being what it is, years passed before we got back to watching it again… But we did. Every night, two episodes of anime for about 6+ months. It has become our ritual. What I didn’t expect was how it would morph into a corner-stone of our school experience. Continue reading “Unit Study: Bleach and Japan”

Derailed by ‘Le Grande Project’

You know, I had a post planned for Christmas. I had it half-written. All I needed was an hour or so to polish it off….and then wham!

We were derailed by ‘Le Grande Project’. You see, we’d been asking the kids, particularly C, ‘what do you want for Christmas?’ for a while now. And received the dreaded shrug. Variations on ‘is there anything you really want?, elicited similar responses….until three days before Christmas. Yes. Three Days. That was when he wrote his letter to Santa. And oh boy, what a letter. Go have a look at it. Go on. It’s no particle accelerator, but – oh boy!
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Basic Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake

This is the cake I make all the time. I don’t need to look at a recipe anymore, it’s so automatic. I use this cake-base as a start for pretty much all my cakes and cup-cakes – just add other flavours – banana, dates, cinnamon, raspberry, apples or blueberries.  It works beautifully.

This cake is lovely just as it is, but is also lovely iced, or turned into a cinnamon tea cake. Continue reading “Basic Gluten-Free Vanilla Cake”

Pancakes and Fruit Smoosh

This is a guest post from my husband. He and C are the chief chef’s for this recipe. All I can say is that this is on very high rotation at our house. Over to him!

Coconut  Pancake Stack

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This recipe came about through experimentation, desperation, and the inspired input of a 3 year old. We call it pancakes. The finished product is probably technically closer to a pikelet (around 10cm in diameter and about 6mm thick). So I hope the purists out there don’t get too upset. I have no idea just how thin you could get this and have it still remain a coherent pancake, so they shall be pancakes in name.

The following recipe feeds two adults and two small bottomless pits on legs, and there might be some left over if the little ones aren’t completely ravenous.

Assuming you use the plain pancake recipe, then a good topping is a fruit smoosh (name coined by C at age 3). For a smoosh, you basically cook diced fruit in a little butter for as long as it takes for the juices to release a little and the fruit to warm through. Continue reading “Pancakes and Fruit Smoosh”

Putting Together A Chemistry Curriculum

There is quite a difference between the way I thought I would teach chemistry compared to the way C prefers to learn. C is very visual-spatial in his thinking. He absorbs knowledge when he can see it and touch it. He doesn’t mind listening, but he can’t just listen – there has to be a visual component, or lots of space to wiggle and jump around. And when he’s excited by a new idea he gets very loud! Which is a joy. He also loves to play with an idea – to absurdity if possible.

This makes putting together a chemistry curriculum in the more formal way a problem. But it also gives us great scope for experimentation. Afterall, where else can you go? Continue reading “Putting Together A Chemistry Curriculum”